Darren and Gwen Munson - Windermere Mill Creek 425-338-9400
Windermere R.E. Mill Creek

Scholarship Program

Homeownership Scholarship Program

Each year Windermere Living Room at Mill Creek Town Center awards a $2,000 scholarship to a Jackson High School graduating student planning to continue his or her education. The student must be attending a 2 or 4 year institution. The scholarship funds will be placed in the student's account at the institution of their choice.

For information on how to enter this scholarship competition, give us a call at 425/337-1458.

The 2008 Scholarship Recipient was Amber Navran a Jackson High School Class of 2008 graduate. Congratulations Amber. We wish you all the best.

 

Scholarship Criteria

To be eligible, applicants must meet the minimum qualifications below.

  • A senior student attending Jackson High School (living in Jackson HS service area)
  • Grade point average of 3.0 or above (provide documentation)
  • Two letters of reference (not a relative)
  • Be accepted at a 2 or 4 year full-time accredited college
  • Copy of letter of acceptance
  • Typed essay (min. 200 words) on the subject; "What Homeownership Means to Me"
  • Scholarship will be released to the student's account at the college of his/her choice
    Selection committee will notify recipient by May 15th
  • Essays must be submitted on or before May 1st of graduating year
 

What Homeownership Means To Me

Amber Navran, Jackson High School Class of 2008
When asking almost any group of children what their basic needs are, they will respond "food, water, and shelter." Yes, ever since kindergarten we learned our numbers, our ABCs, and what we needed to survive. Soon after, it becomes apparent that, not only do we need a home to survive, but our lives and our culture are shaped around the home and home activities. From eating, and sleeping to growing up, entertaining, and raising a family, owning a home can mean much more than a financial investment. Children grow up dreaming of owning a house of their own. There are video games that allow children to design their dream house and raise a family where many kids spend hours dreaming up the perfect floor plan. I remember playing the game of LIFE and fighting over the houses; they were practically the most important part. From setting up Barbie houses to imagining our own, homeownership and its importance are evident at an early age and only become more important as we grow and become homeowners ourselves.

This importance may be attributed to our views of ourselves. "Early modern Englishmen believed that people can create their own identity, and that therefore one communicates to the world through signals such as dress and other forms of decoration who one is, what group or category one belongs to" (Jane Tompkins). This demonstrates a trait still quite obvious in today's culture. As a high-schooler, I am aware that I am judged for how I dress. I'm encouraged to be unique and define myself through appearance and activities. From my clothes you can see my point of view, social class, interests, political statements, and general things about me. Houses can be seen quite similarly. Our homes place us into a social class, tell about our taste, show off income, hint to our family size, and attest to our cleaning habits. Many people slave away to maintain a yard or improve the house so that the appearance is just right. In my house, it is well known that before any guests arrive, there is always a day of cleaning to be done. Much like our western ideals that clothes can define our character, our houses define us too. From decorations, to location, to size, a owning a house can mean both shelter and identity.

However, no matter the size or the location, it is common knowledge that owning a home is a near necessity for our culture and our lives. From movies like "Sandlot" where children grow up playing sports in their neighborhood, to "Risky Business" that shows the notorious teen house party, our culture and daily routine is dependent on the houses that make up neighborhoods, cities and life styles. A home acts as a refuge where people can relax, escape the work life, and raise a family. No matter how dangerous the neighborhood, people feel safer in their homes as a protection. Raising a family in good conditions and providing a good life for children has always been a concern, and neighborhoods allow people to meet and make friends. Block parties, Thanksgiving, and barbeques: most images of our culture revolve around owning a home. From entertaining to hygiene, houses are a huge part of our lives and owning a house means being able to take part in the American life and the American Dream.

Yes, it is what our country is known for. A car, 2.5 children, a dog, a happily married couple, and a beautiful house define this common dream. For years Americans have strived for the American Dream and this image gives hope to immigrants and children alike. The suburban neighborhood with families playing in the street, city houses with bustling streets, and homey rural houses, are all well known images and different versions of the same dream. Houses shape our cities and our lives. Although it is common knowledge that we need somewhere to call home in order to survive, it is also common knowledge that homeownership is not only a part of the American Dream, it's a pathway to it.

Many Americans have chosen real estate as a career path to making money. They can buy a house and wait for it to appreciate, sell the house for its new value and reinvest into a large home. This pathway has provided millions of families with new prosperity and a new life. However, this investment also brings about aspects of responsibility. When investing such a large sum of money, the responsibility to pay it off and make payments on time is imperative. Although a house means prosperity, stability, and success, it also means responsibility. As a high-schooler, my parents take responsibility for the bills and, as I get closer and closer to taking care of myself, I know that this responsibility will soon by mine.

Although it is the largest investment people will make, it is also the most profitable; buying a home is a significant accomplishment. Affording a stable place to live gives the owner a sense of self and a sense of a strong future. To me homeownership means responsibility, accomplishment, and a future. It means I can carry out the games I played as a child, raise a family, and make memories. It means that I can be apart of our culture and it shows a stability and a lifestyle that I feel privileged to have. Owning a house and living a comfortable lifestyle provides an environment for people to strive for their goals and makes dreams achievable

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Windermere Real Estate/Mill Creek, Inc. | Darren and Gwen Munson | Direct: 425-338-9400 | Fax: (425) 481-9353 e-mail: Darren@Windermere.com
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